• Posted by Shelly on March 14, 2017

    I started off the new year meeting mathematicians from all over America by representing Overleaf at the Joint Mathematics Meetings in Atlanta, GA. Overleaf was a first-time sponsor at JMM 2017.

    Overleaf sponsors JMM17
  • Posted by John on February 28, 2017

    Just over four years ago we began one of our first collaborations – working with Stefan Kottwitz of the LaTeX Community forums and sites such as TeXample.net and pgfplots.net to provide a direct way for users of those sites to open up code examples directly in Overleaf (then called WriteLaTeX).

    To get an idea of how it works, try clicking on the image below. It will open up in Overleaf for immediate editing online, just as if you'd clicked on the "Open in Overleaf" link on the example itself.

    Polar plot of a sine function example from pgfplots.net
  • Posted by Mary Anne on February 27, 2017

    LaTeX template for the Annals of Glaciology (AOG) open in Overleaf rich text mode

    We’re excited to let you know that the two journals of the International Glaciological Society, Journal of Glaciology and Annals of Glaciology, are beginning a partnership with Overleaf. If you’re thinking of submitting to either of the journals, Overleaf is now a freely available option for writing your article.

  • Posted on February 17, 2017

    The first version of code-folding is now live on Overleaf! You can fold and unfold sections to make it easier to navigate through and work on large documents.

    Code-folding of sections of Overleaf

  • Posted by John on February 14, 2017

    We’re excited to announce that Overleaf now has over 600,000 registered users! And not only that… together you've made over 2 billion edits across all the projects you've worked on over the past 4 years. That's simply amazing!

    For those of you wondering what 2 billion edits looks like, it's equivalent to around 11.5 billion pages compiled – so over four years we've compiled (on average) 100 pages each second! Or, to put it another way, if you printed off all of those pages and stacked them up, you'd have a pile 9,000km high – 1000 times the height of Mount Everest!

    We've come a long way since it was just John Lees-Miller and I at the start of it all back in 2013... cue artistic shot of two explorers looking upwards on Mt. Everest – alas no, this isn't John and I :)

    Mount Everest by Lloyd Smith

    Photo by Lloyd Smith, CC BY-SA 3.0, Link to original.


Sign up for a free account and receive regular updates

Registrati

Popular Tags


Start writing now!

Create A New Paper

Overleaf is Gratis

New to LaTeX?
Start with a template

Company